Identities and Inequalities

The critical role that inequalities due to socioeconomic status (e.g., income, employment, education), race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and nativity play in producing health inequalities. Includes a structural approach to understanding the role of racism, sexism, heterosexism, nativism and their intersections (among others).

Recent Publications

Sheehan, C. M., Frochen, S.E., Walsemann, K.M., & Ailshire, J. A. (2018). Are U.S. adults reporting less sleep? Findings from sleep duration trends in the National Health Interview Survey, 2004-2017. Sleep. https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsy221

Mann, E. S. and Grzanka, P. R. (2018), Agency‐without‐choice: The visual rhetorics of Long‐Acting Reversible Contraception promotion. Symbolic Interaction, 41: 334-356. doi:10.1002/symb.349

Pfeffer, C. A. (2017). Queering families: The postmodern partnerships of cisgender women and transgender men. Oxford University Press. https://global.oup.com/academic/product/queering-families-9780199908059?cc=us&lang=en&

Current Projects

Transmasculine Practices of Reproduction

This project represents the first international study to address the sociological and health care implications of the reproductive practices of people who become pregnant and/or give birth after transitioning.

Faculty

Jason Cummings, Ph.D.

Jason Cummings, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Sociology and African American Studies

The racialized experiences of the Black middle class and its consequences for physical and mental health

          

Janelle (Jae) Downing, Ph.D.

Janelle (Jae) Downing, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Health Services Policy and Management

The role of economic stressors on health. Inequities in health and health care access by gender identity, sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.

               

Nicole Hair, Ph.D.

Nicole Hair, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Health Services Policy and Management

Socioeconomic determinants of health and development and the economic costs of chronic illness and disability.

          

Andrea Henderson, Ph.D.

Andrea Henderson, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Sociology

The religious lives of Black Americans and how religion influences health and well-being in the face of stress, including racial discrimination.

     

Emily Mann, Ph.D.

Emily Mann, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Health Promotion and Women’s and Gender Studies

The regulation of sexual and reproductive practices across multiple institutional contexts, including health care, education, families, and the state.

               

Spencer Moore, Ph.D.

Spencer Moore, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Health Promotion

The influence of social networks and social capital on population health and health inequalities in the U.S. and globally.

          

Carla Pfeffer, Ph.D.

Carla Pfeffer, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Sociology and Women’s and Gender Studies

Contemporary families, genders, sexualities, and bodies considered marginal, as well as social actors’ management of stigma and discrimination.

               

Katrina Walsemann, Ph.D.

Katrina Walsemann, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Health Promotion & Director of CHIP

How schools and early life experiences influence racial inequities in life course health.

               

Jaclyn Wong, Ph.D.

Jaclyn Wong, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Sociology

How positive and negative social relationships shape older adults’ health and wellbeing. The role of gender, marriage, and family relationships on life course health.

                   

Bongki Woo, Ph.D.

Bongki Woo, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Social Work

Social and enviornmental determinants of mental health and well-being of people of color.

           

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